Dating violence studies in undergraduate

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) and dating violence is a significant problem among college-age students.

IPV has an associative outcome of depression and lower academic performance, but it is unknown how it relates to undergraduate nursing students.

More men perpetrated sexual violence; more women perpetrated physical violence.

More than half (130 of 227) of the violence experienced during college was partner related.

AB - Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) and dating violence is a significant problem among college-age students.

Conclusion: Relevant data on the prevalence rates of IPV and depression among nursing students are lacking.

Self-administered surveys were used to obtain prevalence estimates of relationship violence among urban college students.

Three colleges were chosen to provide a demographically diverse sample of students.

Results: Initial results yielded 24,675 research studies on IPV, dating violence, and depression.

Recent studies exploring gender symmetry have used convenience samples of students in social science classes Most studies of adolescent relationship violence have focused solely on partner violence, not the broader range of relationships that develop in college (with friends, acquaintances, and partners) in which violence may occur.

Transitioning to college may influence adolescents' vulnerability to involvement in violent relationships, as adolescents in an unknown environment may experience isolation as they leave social supports from home.

We are unaware of any existing studies that explore past and current physical, sexual, and emotional victimization and perpetration among adolescent men and women in a broad range of college relationships within the same sample.

By including randomly selected classes from 3 diverse college campuses, the present study expands on the literature by providing a more comprehensive examination of rates of violence among male and female undergraduate students.

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